Rollercoasters Are For Kids

There was a time that I loved the anticipation, maybe the pure adrenaline, while sitting in the first car of the rollercoaster climbing that initial hill just before the big drop… click…click…click…click… The old wooden ones always had the soundtrack of clicks all the way to the top, then in an instant, we would be falling at what seemed like the speed of sound, with our arms in the air, screaming at the top of our lungs, winding around turns, climbing shorter hills and dropping again and again and it never lasted long enough. Come to think of it, I still love rollercoasters when I’m at an amusement park. I bet many of you feel the same way and may have even experienced it this past Memorial Day weekend. Those modern coasters are quite a different experience, much wilder than when I was a kid.

The stock market felt a lot like one of those new rollercoasters for the entire month of May. And what a ride it was. We had a “Flash Crash”, followed by a 400-point rally, more than a few highly volatile days, followed by another 300-point rally. Worries from the Euro-zone, sabre rattling by the Koreas, and the biggest oil spill in history each provided major curves in the track, making for one wild ride. We went an entire month without two straight up days. By the close of market on Friday the Dow was down another 122 points , had lost over 1000 points during the month and had turned in its worst May performance since 1940.  I’m sure many traders found the volatility exciting and profitable, while others felt that queezy feeling in their stomachs like they just got off the Big Dipper after eating half a pizza. When all was said and done, the Dow lost 7.9% for the month.

Though market technicals have lost some ground, there is some solace in that the Dow held above the emotional 10,000 level and some analysts see the potential for a bounce. The fact that the major indices held their February lows may be setting up a traditional double bottom. additionally, sentiment readings show the number of bears has risen to levels not seen since last November, just before the Dow climbed 1000 points. Though there are some encouraging signs, the fact remains that the S&P broke below its 160-Day Moving Average in May, which is a bearish signal. It would be wise hedge long positions and keep your eye on the VIX and the dollar for clues as to the what’s next for equities.

Our hedged account has outperformed, as is to be expected, closing May at $1,612,877 vs. $1,539,496 for the unhedged account.

Go to http://optionsprofitzone.com for your FREE report entitled “7 Secrets to Making Money in Bull or Bear Markets”.

Michael

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